Puberty In Females and Males | Get All The Facts and Info

Body changes, stages during puberty in boys and girls


Puberty is the time when you physically move from kid to an adult. During puberty, your body goes through lots of changes. During puberty, your body will grow faster than at any other time in your life, except for when you were a baby. And your emotions might feel stronger and more intense.

Puberty doesn’t happen all at once — it comes in stages and takes many years. Everyone goes through these changes differently, so you may recognize some of these changes happening now, and others may not happen at all. Puberty is different for everyone – each of our bodies takes its own natural course.



Puberty is a normal part of life. But it’s still common to feel anxious, excited, and confused about it. Knowing what to expect can make puberty changes seem less weird or stressful. And talking to your parents or other adults you trust also helps. After all, they’ve gone through puberty too. So they probably understand how you feel, and have good advice.

Many of these changes are caused by hormones, special signalling chemicals that are produced by glands in our bodies and that give directions to our cells to do particular things. All of the changes happening to your body during puberty can have an impact your emotions. You might feel happy one moment and completely sad or angry the next. These kinds of mood swings are normal during adolescence.

When does puberty start?

There is no set age when this will happen. Puberty may start when you are eight or it may not start until much later.

In girls, puberty can starts anywhere between the ages of 8 and 13 years old but often the first changes happen around 10 or 11 years of age.

In boys, puberty tends to start a little later than for girls – somewhere between 10 and 15 years. For many boys, the first changes start to happen when they are around 11 or 12 years old.

Changes to the Male Body during puberty

Changes to the Male Body during puberty

Growth and shape

Your body is growing and sometimes it might grow quickly in a short time. All of sudden you might be much taller and find that your clothes don’t fit anymore. During puberty you will probably grow about 4 inches per year. Most of the growth spurt happens towards the end of puberty. You will also notice other changes to your body shape, such as more muscle development and larger shoulders. Remember that everyone grows at their own pace.

Penis and Testicles

As you transition to an adult, you will notice growth of your testicles, as well as enlargement of your penis. This usually marks the beginning of puberty.

Body hair

Pubic hair usually appears on the genitals after the growth of the penis and testicles. After that, underarm hair begins to grow, and later on, hair might start to grow on the face and chest as well. Some people choose to remove body hair. This is a personal choice, but is not necessary.

 

Voice

The larynx is in your throat and is what gives you your voice. During puberty, your larynx will grow and it might stick out in the neck area – this is called the Adam’s apple. When the larynx grows, it will cause a deepening of the voice. This usually happens in the beginning of puberty. It’s normal to experience changes in your voice or notice your voice breaking at times.

Skin changes during puberty

Many teenagers will notice that as they go through puberty their skin becomes oily and pimples start to appear on the face and body. This is due to hormonal changes.

Ejaculation

About a year after the penis starts growing, most boys will experience their first ejaculation. Thus a release of sperm and other liquids from inside the male reproductive tract that comes out through the penis. This can sometimes be scary or worrisome, but it is perfectly natural and is a part of going through puberty.

Sweat and body odour

The body’s sweat glands become more active during puberty, which can mean an increase in body odour. This is normal and can usually be resolved by using a deodorant.

Is my penis normal?

Penises are like snowflakes: no 2 are exactly alike. Thick or thin, long or short, straight or with a little curve — everyone’s got their own thing going on in the penis department. So unless it hurts or feels uncomfortable, it’s safe to say your penis is totally normal.

At some point during puberty, penises start to get bigger and longer. This happens at different ages for different people. It can take several years for your penis to grow to its final size.

For adults, the average penis size is about 2.5 to 5 inches long when flaccid (soft). And it’s about 5 to 7 inches long when erect (hard). The size of your penis when it’s flaccid (soft) doesn’t really have anything to do with how big it gets when it’s hard. Some penises get much bigger when they’re erect, and others stay pretty much the same size.

A lot of people stress about the size of their penis, but there really isn’t one “normal” size. And the myth that “bigger is always better” is just not true. Instead of getting hung up on numbers and measurements, it’s better to love your body the way it already is. And you might still be growing, so try not to worry.



There’s nothing you can safely do to change the size of your penis. Penis enhancement pills, creams, and devices do NOT work. And surgeries are expensive, risky, and don’t make much of a difference.

The bottom line is: all penises are different. And the way your penis looks has nothing to do with how good sex will feel, or how good you’ll be at sex. You can grow up to have a totally satisfying sex life, no matter what kind of penis you’re packing.

Changes to the Female Body during puberty

Changes to the Female Body during puberty

Growth and shape

Your body is growing and sometimes it might grow quickly in a short time. It is normal to experience a growth spurt as part of puberty. This will usually happen before you get your first period. You will also notice other changes to your body shape, such as more curves or wider hips.

Breasts

Breast development usually marks the beginning of the puberty. At first, you will notice small raised bumps behind the nipple, and the bumps will continue to grow and take shape as breasts. One breast may develop before the other; this is completely normal. Fully developed breasts come in all shapes and sizes. Depending on the size of your breasts, you may feel the need to wear a bra to support them, especially when you exercise.

Skin

Many teenagers will notice that as they go through puberty their skin becomes oily and pimples start to appear on the face and body. This is due to hormonal changes.

Vaginal discharge

As you go through puberty, your body will start to produce a whitish vaginal discharge. It is normal and it helps to clean and moisten your vagina. If you experience itching, burning, or notice a strong odour, or a change in colour (such as brown, gray, or green), these may be signs of an infection. It’s best to see a doctor to have this looked at.

Body hair

Pubic hair usually starts to appear on the genitals after the breasts start growing. You will also notice hair growing in the underarms and on the legs. Some people choose to remove body hair. This is a personal choice, but is not necessary.

Periods during puberty

It’s normal to be nervous or afraid, especially if you don’t know what to expect, but starting your period (also referred to as menstruation) is a natural and normal part of female puberty. Learn more about your period.

Sweat and body odour

The body’s sweat glands become more active during puberty, which can mean an increase in body odour. This is normal and can usually be resolved by using a deodorant.

When will I get my first period?

There’s no way to know exactly when you’ll get your first period. One day, you’ll see blood in your underwear or on your sheets, and boom — there it is! There may be signs of your first period (like cramps, bloating, or pimples), but this doesn’t happen for everyone.

Most people get their first period between ages 12 and 15, but some people get theirs earlier or later than that. Your period might start around the time it did for other people you’re related to, like your mom or sisters. If you don’t get your period by the time you’re 16, it’s a good idea to go to your doctor. This is just to make sure everything’s okay.

It’s totally normal to be anxious or curious about getting your period, but try not to stress about it too much. Everyone’s body is different, so everyone starts their periods at different times. You never know when it’s going to show up, so carrying a tampon or pad in your bag can help you feel more ready for when your first period comes.

How often will I get my period?

Your period will last somewhere between three and seven days. Some girls have short periods and others have periods that last a little longer. The time between the start of one period and the next is called the menstrual cycle.

The menstrual cycle usually lasts about 28 days. This means there are 28 days between the start of your last period and the start of your next period. Cycles can be longer or shorter than this.

What happens to my body during the menstrual cycle?

During puberty, your female reproductive organs begin to develop. When females are born, there are hundreds of thousands of eggs (ova) inside their ovaries.

When you’ve reached puberty, each month these hormones will cause an egg to start maturing and be released from the ovary. This process is called ovulation.

The egg moves along the fallopian tube towards the uterus. At the same time, the lining of the uterus becomes thick and soft with blood and tissue. This happens just in case the egg is fertilized. It would then implant itself into the lining of the uterus and grow.

Fertilization only happens if the egg joins with a sperm from a male. More often than not, the egg isn’t fertilized so it is just reabsorbed back into the body.

When the egg is not fertilized, the lining of the uterus is not needed so it comes away and is released through your body through your vagina.

This is what is called menstruation or a period.



About felclinic 584 Articles
Felix Ntifo is a Registered General Nurse who has so much passion to improve health care delivery. He founded FelClinic with the hope of making health information accessible to everyone who may not come in contact with him personally. "At felclinic.com we are very passionate about health and well-being of everyone. Our team is made up of professional doctors, nurses, midwives and lab technicians."

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